New Study of the Words “A” and “The” Sheds Light on Language Acquisition

And one more question: When kids start using language, how much of their know-how is intrinsic, and how much is acquired by listening to others speak?

Now a study co-authored by an MIT professor uses a new approach to shed more light on this matter — a central issue in the area of language acquisition.

The results suggest that experience is an important component of early-childhood language usage although it doesn’t necessarily account for all of a child’s language facility. Moreover, the extent to which a child learns grammar by listening appears to change over time, with a large increase occurring around age 2 and a leveling off taking place in subsequent years.

“In this view, adult-like, rule-based [linguistic] development is the end-product of a construction of knowledge,” says Roger Levy, an MIT professor and co-author of a new paper summarizing the study. Or, as the paper states, the findings are consistent with the idea that children “lack rich grammatical knowledge at the outset of language learning but rapidly begin to generalize on the basis of structural regularities in their input.”

Read more: Neuroscience News

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