MIT Student Engineers Invented a Real-Time Text-To-Braille Translator

With just a few hours left to build a groundbreaking gadget, things weren’t going as smoothly as planned.

Six young women, all undergrad engineering students at MIT, had established a lofty goal: to create the first-ever affordable device that immediately translates printed text into Braille. The idea could prove revolutionary for the blind community, transforming how they read while also creating sorely needed opportunities for children with low or no vision.

But throughout the hectic, 15-hour MakeMIT hackathon last February, the women — competing as Team 100% Enthusiasm — were running into snags. The lines for hackathon participants to use the 3D printers were taking forever. The team laser-cut the wrong material for the casing. And the optical recognition software they wanted to use — crucial for the device to actually work — wasn’t turning up accurate translations of text.

“It turned out to be a lot harder than we thought,” says Charlene Xia, one of the team members.

Read more: Mashable

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