Learning a Second Language Linked to Synesthesia

People with synesthesia experience the sensory world in a unique way — for example, they “taste” words or “hear” colors. Now, new research suggests that people who learn a second language but aren’t exposed to that second language very early in life are more likely to have this sensory-switching ability than those who are natively bilingual.

“Groups of people with different linguistic backgrounds have different rates of synesthesia — and quite different rates,” said study co-author Marcus Watson, an experimental psychologist at York University in Toronto. “It ranges from 0 percent to about 5 percent depending on what their language background is.”

The findings bolster a theory that synesthesia — the bizarre brain phenomenon in which one sensory or cognitive experience is automatically triggered by another — may develop to improve learning in complicated, ruled-based tasks such as mastering reading, music theory and time telling.

Read more: Live Science

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