Wikipedia ‘facts’ depend on which language you read them in

December 14th, 2016 by Like Facebook and Twitter, Wikipedia could have its own filter bubbles. A new website lets you uncover geographical biases in Wikipedia articles by tracking down where editors of different languages source their information. Insert the URL of any Wikipedia page into Wikiwhere and the site’s algorithm trawls the web to find out where the references cited in the entry originate from. Martin Körner at the University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany, and his colleagues made the tool to compare how Wikipedia articles about the same topic but in a different language might be influenced by different sources. In the English language version of an article on Russia’s annexation of Crimea, for example, they found that 24 per cent of linked references came from Ukrainian new sources while nearly 20 per cent came from Russian sources. In the German version of the same article, however, the balance tipped, with Russian sources making up ten per cent of the total citations and Ukrainian sources only representing three per cent. Read more: New Scientist

Social media decoding dictionary launched for concerned parents

September 7th, 2015 by Parents concerned their children are offering to GNOC and give away their ASL will be able to decode social media using a language guide launched by government. The dictionary translates "popular teen chat acronyms", including get naked on cam (GNOC) and age, sex, location (ASL) often used by children using anonymous chat rooms to disclose their personal details. The tool will help eagle-eyed parents spot when their child issues a P999, also known as a parent alert, or a CD9 (Code 9), to make their online friends aware their parents are around. Read more: The Telegraph