Tagore Translation Deemed Racy Is Pulled From Stores in China

February 8th, 2016 by BEIJING — More than 80 years after his death, Rabindranath Tagore, the Bengali poet and Nobel laureate, still has a huge following in Asia. Outside India and Bangladesh, perhaps nowhere is his legacy more alive than in China, where his works have been part of the middle-school curriculum for decades. This month, to commemorate the 155th anniversary of his birth, the People’s Publishing House will release “The Complete Works of Tagore,” the first direct translation of his entire output from Bengali into Chinese. The project took a team of translators nearly six years. But Tagore has also been at the center of a controversy here, after another, more racy new translation of some of his poems by the writer Feng Teng, called “Stray Birds,” set off a storm of criticism. The furor was so intense that the Zhejiang Wenyi Publishing House pulled the volume from stores. Read more: NY Times‎

Chinese writer’s translation of Rabindranath Tagore’s works draws ire

December 22nd, 2015 by BEIJING: A Chinese writer has translated Rabindranath Tagore's works with "vulgar" sexual connotations, drawing sharp condemnation from the admirers of the Nobel Laureate in China who termed it as a desperate attempt to gain popularity. "There's a fine line between imprinting creative works with unique personality and screaming for attention," columnist Raymond Zhou wrote in state-run China Daily, criticising the writer, Feng Tang, who has published new translations of Tagore's poems. "Feng just crossed it, when he translated Tagore's tranquil verse into a vulgar selfie of hormone saturated innuendo," Zhou wrote in his column titled "Lust in translation". Read more: NDTV‎