The Unknown Story of the Greeks Who Shaped the Latin Alphabet

February 3rd, 2020 by The Latin alphabet is undoubtedly the world’s most recognizable form of written language, whose history goes back in time to the eras of ancient Greek and Roman dominance of the entire Western world. In its modern form, with its many variations and alterations, the Latin alphabet is officially used by an amazing 131 sovereign nations, and it is also a co-official script form in twelve other countries. Even in the countries which do not use it officially, most of their people not only recognize it, but they can also read it, mainly due to the global influence of the English language in our time. However, the exact origins of the Latin alphabet now used by billions of people are relatively unknown, and very few people are actually aware that the Latin alphabet itself finds its roots in an older form of Greek writing. The Origins of the Latin alphabet It is widely accepted in the linguistic community that the Latin alphabet is a product of a long and complicated journey which ultimately has its roots back in the hieroglyphic tradition of ancient Egypt. However, its most obvious and prominent influence derived from the Greek alphabet itself. It was no other than the Euboean variation of the Greek alphabet, used on the island of Euboea (Evia) in Greece, which ultimately created what we now call the ”Western Greek alphabets.” The western Greek alphabets shaped, in their turn, the Etruscan alphabet, the direct predecessor of the alphabet used by the Romans to write the Latin language. The Euboean alphabet was used by the Greeks who lived in the cities of Chalkis and Eretria beginning in the early years of Greek antiquity. Read more: Greek Reporter

Jon Snow knows nothing but a translator knows a lot

July 6th, 2016 by The universe built by G.R.R. Martin is not just a beautiful, haunting story, but also a real minefield for translators all over the world. Far from being invisible, as argued by many scholars, the translator adds his/her own contribution to the course of a book towards the reader. As a literary translator, an avid reader and fan of the books and show myself, I had been wondering how on earth had the various translators managed to render such a complex mosaic of characters and plots to a smooth, compelling narrative to their respective languages. I interviewed the translator of 3 of the GoT books in Greek, Alexandra Letsa, who was more than happy to shed some light in the dark and sinister world of Westeros and beyond, where Lannisters always keep their debts, Starks reunite, dragons are re-born and all fans await the Winds of Winter. Read more: Huffington Post